Washing Dishes in Japan

Washing Dishes in Japan


[AIKO] Where I’m from, this is how to wash dishes. Where I’m from, this is how you wash dishes. I don’t do dishes that much, so… Well… I kind of know, so… like… You scrub it… …kind of yucky, so I don’t wanna… wash it that much. Eew! But you have to do that. It’s kind of quiet. It’s kind of boring. I don’t… do this, so I don’t know… how… hard it is. I always think it’s yucky and eewy but…
you have to do it. It’s the job. Well, I feel like I don’t wanna do it. There is no dishwasher in Japan. [GREG]
What??? [AIKO] Japan is small and there’s lots of people, but like Canada or America… or like… other stuff, or big, and there is not that much people,
so their houses are big too. They have like big washing machines… for the dishes. So… you don’t need to do it, but in Japan, most houses don’t have dishwashers, but only just a teeny tiny bit of houses have…
maybe have dishwashers? [GREG]
Yeah. I think the dishwasher… like in a new japanese home, would be like that size. [AIKO] Oh. [GREG]
So it’s like half the size of the…
North-American dishwasher. [AIKO] Oh. That’s where all the water goes down. Ah! It’s so icky. [GREG]
How big is that basket? Pick it up. [AIKO] Do I have to? [GREG]
Yeah. I wanna see this basket.
Everybody wants to see what’s in the basket. [AIKO] Eew! [GREG]
It’s only food you’ve been eating. There’s a handle on it, silly…
Right there. That’s the handle. Yeah. Grab it. There you go. So that’s a pretty big basket. What’s in there? [AIKO] Food that you left, or something. [GREG]
Ah. OK. Yeah. So you can just dump all your food in there first.
You don’t have to dump your food on the garbage first, when you clean your dishes, right? [AIKO] Yeah. [GREG]
OK. Put it back in. Oh. Wait. Let’s see inside.
What’s inside the hole? Ah! That’s what it looks like. [AIKO] Oh. Yeah. [GREG]
OK. Put it back there. So you put these dishes away on those racks there, right? [AIKO] Yeah. In my house we have these, um… this one here.
We have these. So it comes from… the… air comes from the bottom and then, so it can be dried. This place is for like chopsticks and like forks. There is no place to put it… so small,
so in our house we put it like this. Yeah. I’m all done. [GREG]
How about this? [AIKO] Oh. You had this? How about this? [GREG]
Yeah. That too. [AIKO] Oh, no! And I might be soapy. Well, sometimes I think dishwashing is kind of yucky, eewy, but if you just do it, it’s kind of fun, but It’s kind of yucky. [GREG]
You didn’t use this pan here [AIKO] Yeah. [GREG]
But, have you seen this before? [AIKO] Yeah. I’ve seen it in my auntie’s house. [GREG]
What they do is they put water in it. And they put all the dirty dishes in it. And it soaks… the dishes. [AIKO] Ooooh! [GREG]
Sometimes they use it for that. Yeah. Well, see these edges? It goes down and down. So it’s very easy to put stuff down into the sink. But in Canada, I think the edges go up like this. It’s like a bump.
So it’s hard to like push everything into the sink. [AIKO] Oooh! I’ve never… thought about that. [GREG]
Yeah. Because you never do it. [AIKO] Ha, haa! [GREG]
There is a little water… in your… nose. [AIKO] Thanks for watching. See you next time. Bye! Donuts! I eat it. Bye. I’m done. Oh! [GREG] How about that one?
[AIKO] Aaaah! Ha, haaa! I forgot! Aw! Ugh! I’m finally done!!!

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