Podcast #93 – Primal Movements w/ BJ Baker – Bulletproof Radio

Podcast #93 – Primal Movements w/ BJ Baker – Bulletproof Radio


Transcript of Alexis Bright Bulletproof Radio podcast #63 Warning and Disclaimer The statements in this report have not been
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hot and burn you. If you do not agree to the above conditions,
please do not read further and delete this document. DAVE: Today’s cool fact of the day is that
it will take you about twice as long to lose new muscle when you stop working out than
it took you to gain it in the first place. This is one reason that once you build muscle
you can afford to take a little bit of time off without really doing much damage. You’re listening to bulletproof radio with
Dave Asprey from the bulletproof executive blog. Today’s gonna be kind of cool because
we get to have another session with Alexis Bright. Alexis runs our Q&A sessions and she’s
one of the people behind the podcasts. Alexis, thanks for coming on to be our question master. ALEXIS: Thanks for having me. It’s always
fun to get to talk to you, Dave! DAVE: So, what are some of the latest biohacks
you’re working on? ALEXIS: So I’ve been playing with the Bulletproof
sense app powered by Sweet Water for iPhone and before anybody says anything about android,
can you tell them what’s up with android? DAVE: We are working on it but it’s Food Sense,
not Bulletproof Sense. ALEXIS: There’s the bulletproof food sense
but then there’s the other bulletproof app. DAVE: Which is HRV Sense. ALEXIS: Right. The HRV Sense. Okay. DAVE: Ah, no problem. That app is actually
really cool. I’m not wearing my monitor right now, but it’s sitting here on my desk somewhere
and I’m loving that app like, all day stress management stuff is kinda cool. ALEXIS: Totally. I’m actually wearing it right
now and recording my data. DAVE: Can we put a picture of your data into
the video stream for this to show people how stressed you were while talking? ALEXIS: Yeah! Totally. Yes, yes. DAVE: Oh that’s awesome. ALEXIS: I’ve been gathering baseline data,
it’s been changing my exercise routines because if my heart rate variability is low that day,
relative to how it’s been other days, then I’ll skip exercising and I notice that I’m
actually feeling better and getting a little bit more out of my exercise because of that.
I’m also wearing a monitor in different settings. Like with my boyfriend, with clients and meetings,
playing halo 4. And like, with my boyfriend, with clients and meetings, I’ve gotten my
friends to experiment with it too and I have a question for you. DAVE: Okay ALEXIS: It’s a couple of questions. So I’ve
found that using Inner Balance for the emWave is still the best way for me to start to train
my heart rate variability and when I try to do the same thing wearing only the HRV monitor
and using the HRV app, that I’m not getting the same results. So I was wondering why is
it that the emWave is what seems well iOS inner balance is what seems to be working
better for me for training the HRV?? DAVE: It’s really kind of cool that you ask
because I carry both of them on the store. On Upgraded Self. One of them, the inner balance
sensor that hooks up on the iPhone, I think, I don’t know, my iPhone’s floating around
here somewhere. That thing is the best trainer I know of and part of it’s the IU. It also
has a breath pacer on it and the algorithm is designed specifically for training. The
only problem is you’re not gonna walk around with like an ear clip on all the time and
it’s not motion mitigated so if it wiggles, it changes the perceived heart rate variability
so it’s good if you’re gonna sit in focus for ten minutes or fifteen minutes, I use
inner balance. I put it on my kids. It’s great to watch them take deep breaths. But if you
wanna know how you’re doing all day long or maybe you wanna do a quick bit of training,
you certainly can use the HRV sense app. In fact, I was at JJ Virgin’s mastermind.
She’s the author of The Virgin Diet and a New York Time’s Best Seller and she puts together
this group of mostly doctors who get together and talk about this kind of stuff. So, I wore
my strap all the time. My polar heart monitor, and I was using HRV sense and sometimes I
would notice my heart rate variability would drop into like, 40 if I was feeling a little
tired or whatever, and I would literally just do the technique that you learn doing the
heart math inner balance sensor until I could get my level up to 60 and it usually took
me a minute or two. So I learned that I could actually watch during the day and just every
now and then go, “Oh it’s lower than I want it” and consciously will rise as long as
you have that skill set, but I’ve never tried developing the skill set just from HRV sense.
It’s like you lift weights in order to build muscle and that’s inner balance. Then if you
wanna know how strong you are all day long, that’s something else and that’s what you
get from HRV sense. ALEXIS: Okay, that makes sense. Thank you.
And the other thing I’ve found interesting, I have a friend that I talked into playing
with my polar H7 strap and my heart rate monitor and so he got a base line of around 70 for
his heart rate and his basic HRV was around 60/65. And then he smoked some pot and his
pulse went up to 130 beats a minute and stayed there for about 3 hours and his HRV dropped
to 8. And based on– DAVE: Holy crap. ALEXIS: Yeah, based on the research I did
it indicates that an elevated pulse is actually normal and I saw some inconclusive stuff related
to heart rate variability and marijuana. Someone, at least one study I saw said it suggested
that it increases it, but I thought that was really interesting that it dropped to 8, so
do you have many ideas about that? DAVE: I would wanna see his SPO2 or the amount
of oxygen in his blood. You’ve seen me in my creativeLIVE videos some of the others,
it’s a little blue sensor you put on your finger. You can buy these at a drug store
and they tell you how much oxygen’s there. If the act of smoking increased carbon monoxide
in his blood and that meant that basically, he had less oxygen saturation, his body may
have responded by making the heart beat faster. It’s just a theory, but that would stress
your body, which would cause your HRV to drop but HRV of 8 isn’t that good. I think maybe
he should try eating some next time and seeing what the difference is. This is one of the
reasons I am not a huge fan of smoking pot. For people who are gonna use it, if you nebulize
it or you eat it or even like the transdermal preparations, they have the benefits of cannabis
as a medical herb but they don’t have the negative impacts of breathing smoke of any
kind. Even a water pipe is gonna be better than just rolling it in a paper. ALEXIS: That makes sense. Yeah, and if there
are any podcast listeners out there that have their own data on that, I’d love to see it.
I’d think it’d be really interesting for all of our listeners to know stuff like that.
And of course, post anonymously. DAVE: Unless you live in Washington State
or Colorado or somewhere like that. ALEXIS: Right. So Dave, what’s your biohack
of the week? DAVE: I have been—since I guess maybe ten
years old—I’ve had this spot on my thigh about this big and it’s grown to be about
this big where there’s very little sensation. So you can tap me there and I won’t feel it.
And I’ve been to a few neurologists and all, and they’ve said various things over the years
but no one really knows what it is. So I’ve been stimulating that nerve with an infared
device that also does PMF. I’ve been using my SomaPulse as well. This is the SomaPulse
if you check this out on creativeLIVE, we actually have a code for the SomaPulse if
you wanna get one, it’s 400 dollars off which more than pays for the cost of the show. So
this is a device that speeds cellular regeneration and increases athletic performance but I also,
at the same time, was using a proprietary prototype of an infared pulse stimulator.
An infared device I kinda fell asleep with it. I have a history of not doing good things
while biohacking while asleep so I woke up and I had burned something exactly the shape
of Africa into the side of my leg. ALEXIS: Oh no. DAVE: So, I’m like “That’s not good.”
So I’m looking at wound healing because it’s just big enough that it doesn’t need a skin
graft. It doesn’t hurt at all, but I’m taking excessive amounts of hydrolized collagen and
vitamin C and properly changing the dressings on it and I’m just looking at the healing
rate for what’s a relatively large burn. It doesn’t really like, hurt a lot. ALEXIS: Okay. That makes sense. Yeah, my dad
saw the creativeLIVE event and he’s really psyched about doing a bunch of stuff. I’ve
been telling him to go gluten free for a couple years now, and he’s reduced gluten and then
he saw the creativeLIVE show and he’s gone gluten free and he’s like “Wow! There really
is a difference!” DAVE: We hacked your dad. That’s awesome. ALEXIS: I know! That’s amazing! So, it’s great
to hear when family and friends are feeling better just through living through example.
So just through living through example. Oh one of the things I wanted to mention to you
on creativeLIVE, when you’re talking about the happiness thing, you had mentioned that
you disagreed with the Set Point Theory and your instinct was right on that there is not—that
the Set Point Theory, there’s new evidence that suggests that your set point, which researchers—what
that is is researchers found that if you won the lottery or you lost a limb, within about
two years your level of happiness would be at the same place that it was before that
event. And so that’s why they thought there was a set point theory and new research is
showing that up to 50% of your happiness could be genetically determined. 10% was related
to circumstantial factors. The remaining 40% was determined by your habits and your activities
and the ways you taught yourself to think and behave. So I thought that was really cool
that your instinct was right on and that there’s also research to back that up. DAVE: So people probably don’t know this about
you, Alexis, but you sort of did your graduate pieces on happiness. ALEXIS: I did. Yeah. I’ve a Masters in Family
Therapy and my original focus was on a career woman who decided not to have children and
the emotional impact on that, and I decided happiness was just a better topic. It made
me happier too. DAVE: There ya go. Following your happiness
makes you more Bulletproof. And when you say it’s a matter of habits, like one of the habits
that makes me happy is something as simple as shining a laser on my forehead during podcasts.
It just works. Okay, maybe not. But it does change your brain. ALEXIS: It changes your brain but it’s also
the behavior itself is sending a message to you at your core that you care about yourself
enough to take an interest in how you’re doing and your own well being. DAVE: That was perhaps the mushiest thing
we’ve had on our Bulletproof Executive podcast. ALEXIS: I know. DAVE: What part of you is it showing that
it cares about? Like which part of your brain is talking, which part of your brain? ALEXIS: It depends on your theory of mind.
I go from more—I go from a parts work based model, so I don’t necessarily have an answer
to that, but this thing that you consider ‘self’, have you ever felt like you wanted
to make two different decisions at the same time and you’ve felt conflicted? DAVE: Uh so– ALEXIS: Maybe in the past, maybe not now? DAVE: So yeah, certainly. You can have conflict.
You have competing goals and those can actually be different parts of yourself. ALEXIS: Exactly. DAVE: I buy that. ALEXIS: Exactly. And so really it’s you know,
there’s a part of me that does care about you and all of us have all these different
parts based on the parts model and it doesn’t mean you’re schizophrenic or anything, it
just means that there are different aspects of self and conceptualizing them can help
you integrate and so it’s like if you were leading a company, getting all the people
on the same page in the company ya know because if– DAVE: Yeah ALEXIS: For people that have experienced trauma,
there are parts of them that get stuck at certain ages. Or you could look at them—trauma
can sort of isolate neural networks and then they only get activated if they’re triggered
by something, which then you’ll have an emotional memory flooding the present moment and that
can make it hard for you to make a decision. Alright– DAVE: Most definitely. That’s one of the reasons
that I do the work with NeuroFeedback that I do is to get all the parts talking to each
other first of all and then, working for a common goal. And oh my god when you get yourself
out of your own way, really cool stuff happens. Like, Alexis, I didn’t think we were gonna
talk about any of this. In case when you’re listening to this we plan all this ahead of
time, no. We’re just chatting. Alexis’ recording studio is actually—I think that’s your bathroom
behind you, Alexis? ALEXIS: It’s my bathroom covered in towels
to dampen echo. DAVE: Which is way cool if you ask me. That’s
like serious environmental hacking right there. So we’re just talking because this is the
cool stuff that came up, but we did prepare ahead of time with some questions. So Alexis,
we have a list of questions from listeners. I think a lot of them came from creativeLIVE. ALEXIS: Yes. DAVE: If you haven’t seen creativeLIVE or
you don’t know about it, for the last 60 days pretty much the entire Bulletproof team has
been helping to put together content for this 18 hour 3 day course with video, live audience,
demos, how to make Bulletproof Coffee, how to get some ice cream and pretty much the
whole suite of biohacking knowledge that you’d want, we put it all together into this video
course. If you go to creativelive.com and search for the Bulletproof Life or Dave Asprey,
you’ll find it. There’s also the brand new Bulletproof Diet
infographic which is a complete transformation of the old one that worked but was kind of
clunky and ugly, like this thing has all kinds of new info. This is the backbone for the
new book. If you go to bulletproofdietbook.com, you can preregister to get the first chapter
of the book as well. So check out creativeLIVE, look at the course. The course comes along
with a bunch of freebees including some coupon codes for technologies and stuff like that.
In the meantime, we have 30,000 people watching that. And we got a ton of great questions.
Alexis has gone through and curated those questions so we’re taking some of the best
ones right now. So Alexis, let’s get started on that list
so we don’t run out of time on this podcast. ALEXIS: Sounds good. So the first question
comes from Sam17: “Could it be possible that a person is sensitive or allergic to
MCT oil? I experienced that my throat gets kind of tight when I add MCT, and I thought
you can only be allergic to protein. If you’re allergic to coconut, is there an alternative
to MCT oil you can use?” DAVE: There’s several questions in here, actually.
One of them is “Can you be sensitive to MCT oil?” Yeah, and some percentage of people
are sensitive, especially to the C-10. So if you take MCT oil and it causes persistent
digestive discomfort or if it causes throat irritation, number one, it’ll probably go
away if you keep taking it. But if it still happens, try Brain Octane. Brain Octane is
way smoother than MCT oil, and it’s three times stronger than MCT oil for what it does
in the brain anyway. It’s pretty powerful. So I’ve found 80% of people who feel that
MCT oil is doing something to their throat don’t have that problem when they upgrade
to Brain Octane. Brain Octane removes the longer chain/medium
chain fatty acids and has only the most powerful one that’s about 4% of coconut oil. In terms
of whether you can be allergic to only protein, you can have sensitivities to all sorts of
things that aren’t only proteins. When I say sensitivities I mean your white blood cells
proliferate in response to the presence of this thing, but it’s not an antibody response
caused by protein. My wife and I have directly measured when we ran a medical lab testing
company. We could measure white blood cell proliferation using a radioactive cell counter.
When certain people’s white blood cells are exposed to gold or titanium or nickle or cadmium
which are kind of obvious, but it’s funny that your immune system goes nuts without
an antibody causing it. That can happen. What’s going on here, I think, is physical irritation
not actually an allergic response. The MCT that we use is 100% pure and it should not
cause coconut allergies even if you’re allergic to coconut oil. ALEXIS: Great. I think that’ll be helpful
to a lot of our readers. So the next question comes from Steve D. “I’m allergic to coffee
bean and dairy. Can you recommend alternatives to your Bulletproof Coffee?” DAVE: Well, if you’ve never tried Bulletproof
Coffee with Upgraded Coffee Beans, it is worth a single try even if it’s just a couple sips
depending on what your allergy’s like. A lot of people that are allergic to quote “Coffee”
are allergic to the fermentation stuff basically the scum of fermentation that’s still part
of your coffee. Frankly, sometimes it gives it a really good flavor. The stuff we have
is different in that we don’t allow that process to happen during processing and then we test
for the presence of a whole bunch of compounds. We also test for the presence of histamine
and eliminate it. Histamine does form in coffee and it can survive in the roasting process,
which means you could be getting histamine response from it. So it’s hard to say you’re
allergic to coffee until you’ve actually known you’re testing only coffee without gunk on
it. In terms of dairy, I’ve known 4 people who
don’t tolerate ghee. Everyone else who’s allergic to dairy to the point that even butter effects
them can tolerate ghee, which is clarified butter, where you remove all of the dairy
protein. That said, if you want an alternative to Bulletproof Coffee and you want something
that is like the highest performing, the least irritation, try a teaspoon of Upgraded Vanilla.
This is mycotoxin tested, specially cured vanilla so it doesn’t form mold. Most dried
vanilla beans are—it’s a real problem to get mold toxins in those. So a teaspoon of
that, a sweetener of your choice; Stevia if you like it, or zylitol from American Hardwood
not Chinese Corn. And Ghee and Upgraded Brain Octane Oil which is the uber MCT that goes
beyond normal MCT oil. Blend that up. You can play with ratios, blend it with hot
water and what you get is a hot, strong vanilla beverage and you get a bit of mental clarity
from the vanilla itself. Vanilla has some cool stuff in it, and it was originally used
when we first started using it thousands of years ago as an aphrodisiac and as a medical
herb only in the last few hundred years has it transitioned to a flavoring agent. Do not
do this with synthetic vanilla. Use real herbal vanilla when you do this and I really recommend
stuff that’s not moldy. When you try that, you’re gonna get a delicious beverage with
no caffeine whatsoever and it’s really good. When I’m doing certain kinds of neurofeedback
that require no caffeine because of caffeine’s interaction with Alpha waves in the brain,
this is what I drink. It’s a pretty powerful thing. You could also do like mate or something.
Tea or some of the herbal teas like chamomile is surprisingly good with butter and Brain
Octane in it. ALEXIS: That sounds like a great alternative.
My mom loves the vanilla by the way. She’s requested that I send her some. DAVE: Cool. ALEXIS: Our next question comes from Mattzegal.
He says “I spend so much time preparing food. How much time does Dave, or his wife
Lana, spend per day or week preparing food? DAVE: Six minutes in the morning. That is
boil water while I’m doing something else, pour it over the coffee that I grind while
I’m boiling the water. Four minutes later I decant the coffee into a blender, with butter,
Brain Octane, or Upgraded MCT. And sometimes I’ll put Upgraded Collagen in the blender
as well. I do this every morning with like, a little bit of variations. Sometimes there’s
vanilla or chocolate added but this is my breakfast smoothie. I blend it and then I
drink it while I’m doing something else. It’s really 6 minutes. For lunch, if I have lunch,
which I don’t every day, steamed vegetables in a pan takes about 8 minutes. A head of
cauliflower, a head of broccoli, a bunch of asparagus, whatever you have on hand. It’s
not that much. Frozen vegetables work fine. Pour them into the blender. Add butter. Add
MCT oil. Blend and that is a basic soup. You can add some flavoring agents. Look in Upgraded
Chef and we’ve got—there is several serving of vegetables, a healthy serving of fat and
no protein. If you want protein, you can brown protein which adds another maybe 7 or 8 minutes
while the vegetables are cooking so it doesn’t add a lot more time. And then you put browned
meat. You can put chopped whatever you like chopped olives, things like that into it,
and then for dinner? That’s when you might spend 20 or 25 minutes cooking if you wanna
have steak or hamburgers or something like that along with sweet potatoes or something
along those lines. But overall I spend less than an hour a day cooking and if you do it
right you could do with only a few pans. In fact you can do it with one pan for most meals
sometimes two. I don’t like dishes anymore than you do. ALEXIS: Yeah I take a slightly different approach
that is slightly less Bulletproof. I’ve found a caterer to make 10 meals a week for me from
the Upgraded Chef and I have them all delivered on the same day. I freeze them and defrost
them one by one and that’s how I end up eating my food and I don’t have to cook at all, I
just have to reheat it on the stove and I’m done and I have a great nutritious meal. DAVE: So notice that she freezes those. And
Alexis, I know you and I have talked about this. If you eat leftovers that have been
sitting in your fridge for a couple days and they still taste pretty good, that’s not a
good idea. Histamine forms, mold toxins form, bacterial toxins form and anything especially
for protein and fat that have been heated and reheated like that, you are asking for
it when you take that protein that’s got water in it that doesn’t have preservatives that’s
sitting in the fridge and keeps sitting there. It’s not like spoiling is an on off process.
Spoiling is a decline and it’s got a shaped curve. So you’ll just notice if you eat leftovers
that you didn’t freeze, that it has been out of the fridge for more than 24 hours, you
will lower your performance. ALEXIS: Our next question comes from Erica
Berry from Facebook. She says “Dave, what’s the logic behind avoiding mushrooms?” DAVE: Well they make you see lots of pretty
colors which is a problem. Oh, the other kind of mushrooms, you mean. There are studies,
even of the white button mushrooms, that show that they increase a smooth cell wall proliferation.
Smooth wall cell proliferation, I had my words flipped around in there. Basically a risk
factor for atherosclerosis. They are not bad for you, it’s just that mushrooms have profound
effects inside the human body that go beyond just being fuel. So, I would not recommend
them as a regular food source for many many people. And you can test this with the food
sense app and see if you’re sensitive to them. An enormous number of people are, but we don’t
quite understand some of what they do. When it comes to medicinal mushrooms, I’m a huge
fan! So if you’re gonna take reishi or one of the other mushrooms for immune stimulation,
that’s wonderful! But using them as just a food source without taking into account that
they contain fungal toxins and they fuel the growth of Candida in your body, there are
lots of people who are made weaker by eating mushrooms and I’m not convinced anyone is
made healthier by making mushrooms a major part of their diet. ALEXIS: OrganicJB writes in: “I’ve been
eating Paleo/Bulletproof and drinking Bulletproof Coffee for about 2 weeks. The Bulletproof
Coffee makes me a little nauseous and I have not lost a single pound. I don’t know what
I’m doing wrong and I don’t know how to fix it. Any suggestions please?” DAVE: There’s a lot of info I’d like to have
to answer questions like this. Ya know, how old is this person, what gender are they,
and how much are they eating? How much are they exercising, how much are they sleeping
are the big variables that would come into play to answer that question. What does stand
out is that a little bit nauseous and only having done Paleo or Bulletproof for 2 weeks.
Were they a raw vegan before? Were they on the standard American diet? Were they on a
high fat low protein diet? What’s going on here is for at least the first 6 weeks—actually
it’s usually about 6 weeks—your pancreas needs to learn how to make more lipase, the
enzyme that digests fat. So, what you wanna do is if you’re getting nauseous from bulletproof
coffee is back off on the amount of butter and/or MCT oil until you don’t feel nauseous.
At the same time, take Betaine HCL, a digestive enzyme that contains lipase. What we’re doing
here is supporting your body’s ability to make stomach acid to emulsify the fat and
we’re supporting your body’s ability to make lipase to actually digest the fat. When you
do that, you shouldn’t feel the nausea. The fact you haven’t lost a pound, well it’s only
been 2 weeks and we don’t know how much of the stuff you’re eating or what else you’re
doing, but also what do you look like in the mirror? You can lose inflammation and gain
muscle at the same time so is your body changing and you’re not losing a pound? Or do you still
have the round parts you don’t like and you haven’t lost a single pound? That’s another
big variable, but without more info, it’s tough to know exactly how to answer this. ALEXIS: Yeah I had a friend write me with
a similar complaint and I asked him what he was eating and while it was mostly Bulletproof,
he also ate Dim Sum about once a week and he ate tofu pretty regularly. It’s like “Um…Okay.”
You’re not actually eliminating stuff. DAVE: But when I do coaching clients with
people, I often times, “I’m eating Bulletproof so I take these puffed rice cakes, which by
the way are highly inflammatory and then I put in bacon on them and I have that bulletproof
breakfast.” And it’s like well, you know, you’re not doing it right. So there’s that
question. And sometimes people have other factors causing chronic inflammation. If there’s
a food sensitivity involved, it’s really hard to lose weight when you’re whacking yourself
upside the head. If you’re allergic to eggs and you’re eating eggs for breakfast, or lunch
every day, the inflammation is not gonna go away and your weight loss will be sabotaged. ALEXIS: Makes sense. So this one’s slightly
unrelated to food. I can’t pronounce this guy’s name Mibsnooz00, I don’t know. Sorry
for butchering your name dude. “Hi Dave, I’m 23 and already presenting some hair loss.
Do you have some recommendations to stop hair loss and promote re-growing?” DAVE: I’m interested in this. I still have
a reasonable amount of hair and I’m 40 and about to turn 41 and basically all the guys
in my family are cue ball bald by the time they’re 25 so I believe supplementation’s
helped. Looking at copper is an interesting idea. So are you getting enough copper, do
you have too much? The copper/zinc ratio can play a role there. Things like silica as a
supplement can be helpful. Things as simple as massage work, and it’s not well known,
but Nizarol, the anti-dandruff shampoo also has been shown in a few studies to help with
removing DHT from hair follicles so you might want to consider adding that to what you wash
your hair with. You also might consider not washing your hair with any shampoo at all
and just doing the no-poo sort of thing. People don’t really know this about me, but I quit
using shampoo like five years ago, and I’ve maybe used it five or six times since I quit
using it in general. And all of those times were because I was in a tv studio and they
sprayed some bad smelling hairspray in my hair and I wanted to get the chemicals out
of my hair. The rest of the time, my scalp and my hair health is actually much better
when I don’t wash it at all with basically toxic chemicals. You also could look at what
hair is made out of. It’s made out of collagen. To make collagen, Vitamin C plus Prolene can
be helpful or you could take Upgraded Collagen to provide your body a source of the building
blocks of hair. I’m not claiming that collagen in your diet will cure baldness or anything
like that, I’m just saying that it’s a good idea to have collagen present in your body
as a building block for all of the collagen tissues in your body. ALEXIS: Speaking of Vitamin C, this question
comes from kanika. She says, “Dave, you’ve mentioned vitamin C for several things. Is
there a good kind of Vitamin C versus a bad kind?”?
DAVE: Well, I’m not a fan of calcium ascorbate because most people have too much calcium
anyway. Potassium ascorbate, well, if you’re doing a vitamin C flush, that stuff has a
lot of potassium in it which could conceivably hurt you or even kill you if you had a potassium
overdose. It’s really potassium chloride, the potassium salt that can be risky, but
too much potassium can give you an irregular heartbeat so I would watch out for that one.
The super cheap GMO Chinese Corn derived mass market ones that you’d find at common low
end vitamin stores or Walmart or something like that, are not preferable but they still
do work. I know people who are sensitive to those who actually can’t take them, like corn
based vitamin C at all. It will affect those people. There are also some really expensive
liposomol forms of Vitamin C and you know, we actually just launched our new beyond liposomol
Glutathione. It’s called Glutathione Force that’s amazing stuff. We’re using liposomes
and some other chemicals and natural substances actually to help bring stuff through the gut
lining. I believe that doing without vitamin C is kind of a waste of liposomes to be perfectly
honest. You absorb Vitamin C pretty well, and wrapping it up in fat, I need to see some
more studies. It’s possible that it’s useful. I could see if you have a liposome that you’re
already going to take other stuff in it, but adding a bunch of extra fat to your vitamin
C seems like a marketing thing unless I can find some really good data I haven’t seen.
If you’re interested in getting fat soluble vitamins, see ascorbate palmatate is not a
bad source. You’ll often times find that in other supplements as a preservative. So I
take a little bit of that in a couple of the supplements I take. And then good old fashioned
ascorbic acid’s my favorite kind, and time release ascorbic acid is pretty good. Soloray
makes a nice time release 1,000 milligram vitamin C and adding some bioflavonoids in
with it’s a good idea. ALEXIS: Great. Thank you! Bulletman asks:
“Is avocado a good substitute for butter?” DAVE: No. It’s well known that in a pinch
you can use guacamole to replace human blood plasma, but okay, maybe you can’t. Although,
I say that when I order like, a huge bowl of guacamole with nothing else at a restaurant.
They look at me funny and I explain it’s for intravenous transfusions. So avocados good
for you, I love avocado, it’s a good source of raw fat that isn’t damaged by heat and
light, but it doesn’t have any short chain fatty acids and it doesn’t have conjugated
linoleic acid. So it’s not a good substitute, but there’s no reason that you couldn’t put
a layer of avocado on top of a piece of butter on top of a piece of food and eat that. I’m
down with that. ALEXIS: I wonder if anybody’s tried putting
avocado in their Bulletproof Coffee. I actually might try that and get back to you next time. DAVE: I did. When I was a raw vegan, like
one of the ways you make a creamy smoothie, you either soak cashews and put them in or
you can put avocado in. Like, you can do amazing avocado pudding where you use the Upgraded
Chocolate which is raw, actually, and then you put the raw avocado in, add some MCT oil,
and it’s like the avocado provides the binding agent. You get this like, it’s really creamy
good but nowhere near as good as if you do that and then add 3 or 4 egg yolks. But we’re
getting into heavy duty dessert territory when you do it. But in coffee, there’s enough
of an avocado flavor that competes that I didn’t find it that pleasant. At least add
like, some chocolate or vanilla and cinnamon all at the same time to hide the avocado taste. ALEXIS: I do like avocadoritas, so a margarita
made with avocado and lime juice instead of margarita mix. DAVE: Oh that sounds awesome. I haven’t tried
it, but I will. ALEXIS: Make sure it’s blended as opposed
to on the rocks. DAVE: That sounds disgusting. Chunks of avocado
stuck to ice? Yuck. ALEXIS: Yeah. Blended is the key. Just like
with our coffee. So basalwonder, another coffee question, asks, “Is coffee temperature bad
for nut oils or can we make bulletproof coffee with nut oils?” DAVE: Yeah. It depends on the nut oil. There’s
some very fragile oils in nuts. I would say add the nuts or nut butter rather than nut
oils because most nut oils are solvent extracted although some almond oil can be just pressed
depending on how it’s done. But when you press a nut oil out of the nut, is it stored in
the fridge in a dark glass bottle and was it pressed from a nut that was actually a
healthy nut or was it from a nut that was so ugly and deformed and basically low end
that they decided to press it instead of sell it? Unfortunately what you find is that the
worst quality nuts are used to make oil and then the oil is often times made rancid and
even things like macadamia oil. Well how was it extracted? Okay, let’s say it’s cold pressed
macadamia oil. It has a high smoke point, but just because it has a high smoke point
doesn’t mean that the delicate oils in it don’t get damaged in heat before it starts
smoking. So a lot of people confuse smoke point with where the oils start to break down
and they can break down without smoking. So I would say because of the high omega 3 and
the monounsaturated content, no monounsaturated oils should be put on a stove or in an oven.
But is it okay to blend it with liquid in a blender that’s gonna be at about 180 degrees
Fahrenheit? I think it is for the most part, and I’ve put nut oils in my coffee before,
they just tend to float on top unless you use a nut milk. ALEXIS: Okay. And speaking of oils, waterproof
asks “Can you please tell us the alternative to coconut oil for cooking so we can avoid
the coconut taste for some meals?” DAVE: Butter and Ghee. Ghee is better than
coconut oil for cooking anyway. It is more heat stable than coconut oil. About 15% of
your coconut oil is the same MCT oils that we use in Upgraded MCT and those things are
only good up to a 320 degrees Fahrenheit. They break down above that. So even on the
label there, I put that on the label and say don’t cook above 320. It’s not stable even
though it won’t smoke above 320. It will eventually but it doesn’t smoke at 325. It just breaks
down. So for cooking, use butter if you don’t use the taste of coconut oil. You can also
use expellor pressed coconut oil or even what they call RBD coconut oil which is refined
deodorized bleach and that stuff can have very little coconut flavor. Palm Oil, I don’t
recommend, it doesn’t taste that good. It is saturated but palmetic acid tends to escort
certain toxins past the lining of the gut. ALEXIS: JamaicanEngineer asks, “Has Dave
noticed improved dental health from the Bulletproof Diet?” DAVE: I have noticed improved dental health.
Part of it is you’re getting a ton of vitamin K2 in your butter, and you’re getting adequate
vitamin D. When I was a raw vegan, and this is something that recovering vegans who are
on the forums will talk about, and I think something that I mentioned with Christin Ron
on a recent podcast and also talking with Alex Jamison from the former vegan who was
in Supersize Me. We got to hang out a couple weeks ago and she expressed the same thing
and said “ya know, my teeth, I started getting cavities and tooth pain and when I was a raw
vegan I had to cancel a few meetings because I had so much horrible pain in my tooth and
I went into the doctor, they couldn’t see anything but the pain was there.” So when
I went on the Bulletproof diet, yeah! Like no pain in the teeth, nothing.” What you
will get though is if you drink coffee, Bulletproof or not, you’ll get stains on your teeth. If
you eat blueberries or high phenol foods you’ll get stains on your teeth. Chocolate. So what
do you do about that? Well, hydrogen peroxide as a mouthwash can help. They have whitening
strips and the coolest biohack of all that I heard about recently. I’ve been using activated
charcoal for about 15 years and we just launched the Upgraded Coconut Charcoal which is an
ultra pure ultra ultra fine charcoal. Well, I’ve started opening those capsules and dumping
one on my toothbrush. I have an electric toothbrush. And I read about this online and I thought
it sounds a little bit like hocus pocus, but oh my god. You brush your teeth with that
and the stains go away. So I noticed a substantial improvement in whiteness there and I’ve had
my teeth professionally whitened 6 months ago and I always thought that was a waste
of money, but I do now throw a capsule of activated charcoal on my toothbrush once or
twice a week, and I notice a big difference. ALEXIS: I haven’t actually tried the activated
charcoal. I don’t notice too much staining with my teeth and I’ve been a coffee drinker
for a while. I do have a kind of TMI confession. I didn’t visit a dentist for about 5 years
and the first time after that period I visited a dentist, I’d been bulletproof for about
2 years. He could not believe that I hadn’t seen a dentist in 5 years. He said my teeth
looked really good. So– DAVE: Yeah
?ALEXIS: I mean that’s been my experience of my overall dental health has been by and
large pretty good anyway. I’ve never had a cavity in my entire life. But that he couldn’t
tell it had actually been 5 years was pretty good and he said that it’s because of the
lack of excess sugar in my diet. DAVE: I used to have bleeding gums too as
a kid and massive tarter buildup on the bottom of my teeth, like calcified tartar to the
point that every 4 months I’d go in for a cleaning and they would chip it off. Like
literally, you could feel pieces of it breaking off. Now I understand that tartar buildup
is something that comes from ocratoxin that comes from food or in the environment and
there’s 2 glands underneath your tongue where excess minerals are released and they cause
calcification so if you’re getting tons of nasty plaque on the back bottom of your teeth,
the kind that kind of chips off if you wiggle it with a toothpick or dental floss, that’s
a sign you’re eating or being exposed to some toxins you don’t want or you have a mineral
imbalance. So that plus bleeding gums all the time. All of that stuff resolved and I
know you’re supposed to clean your teeth every 6 months, but I’m kind of busy so I don’t
see a dentist that regularly either. Like, I’ll go in maybe every year to 18 months and
it’s the same thing. “Wow you’re teeth look really healthy! Who cleaned them last time?”
And I’m like “It was you” and then they look at their chart like “That can’t be”
and I’m like “Well, I have less bacteria in my body than the average person.” ALEXIS: Yeah. It’s been a year since I saw
the dentist. So, okay. You mentioned Upgraded Charcoal and I have a couple of questions
from our blog about that. Kurt asks, “Can I take this every day without absorption of
vitamins and minerals in the digestive system? And what about timing for foods and medications?” DAVE: Well, activated charcoal binds to toxins
in the gut including drugs, including thyroid medication, including things made out of protein.
Don’t take it around drugs, don’t take it around prescriptions, don’t take it around
over the counter drugs, and when I say ‘around’ let the other stuff exit your gut and if you’re
on antipsychotic medications, antidepressants, cardiovascular stuff, talk to your doctor
first because who knows. Different substances are treated by the liver differently and we
wouldn’t want to turn up your body’s ability to break down these foreign chemicals so quickly
that suddenly you were without the foreign chemicals if you actually needed them. You’ll
find that if you take it with food, it is generally a good thing to do if the food isn’t
Bulletproof. In fact, I feel much better if I take activated charcoal if I go out to a
restaurant. If I’m going to be sampling like, Cup of Excellence, winning coffee, that stuff
has mycotoxins in it. Not all of it, maybe, but the stuff I’ve sampled, and I am kind
of a coffee guy, it tastes orgasmic. But afterwards there’s a hangover. Like, the mental clarity
that has become my daily norm is not there when I drink these other coffees. So, I take
activated charcoal. It doesn’t fix the problem, but it blunts the effect. So I feel like myself more quickly after I
have it and sometimes it’s worth it to drink really good tasting coffee knowing that I’m
gonna get a bit of a hangover from it compared to my normal state. In terms of will it absorb
vitamins and minerals, there is debate. There are many different sources of charcoal, different
qualities of charcoal, different amounts of granularity, different treatments of charcoal. It turns out the kind of charcoal that I selected
when I was formulating this product is the rarest of all of the charcoals. It’s only
made from coconut shells, it’s the ultra ultra finest mesh, and it’s fully washed in a way
that removes toxic metals from it because when you burn things, even coconut shells,
it concentrates the toxic metals in them. So this is an issue for a lot of common activated
charcoal products. So we went for this ultra pure ultra fine
thing and one camp online says that coconut based kind of natural stuff doesn’t absorb
vitamins from your food. Only things made from like, a coal or petroleum base or some
other non-coconut source are gonna have this problem. I don’t have a study either way.
Like, I cannot tell you with scientific accuracy, so if I’m gonna take a bunch of Upgraded Collagen
or Upgraded Whey, I’m not mixing charcoal in there because I’m defeating the purpose
and I don’t think you should put it in with your grass-fed steak. If you burned your grass-fed
steak on the grill and you’re gonna eat it anyway, then take some and you’ll be able
to absorb the heterocyclic amines and the PAH and the other things that form from over
cooking or burning your meat, and then you’re probably gonna win. So it’s very individualized.
I don’t think it’s dangerous or risky to take this stuff every day. Lana took it every day
when she was pregnant, away from food and vitamins, in order to reduce toxins. To get
less of the things that would contribute to feelings of nausea in the morning. So, this
stuff is pretty safe. It’s one of the safest things I know of to take. Your risk might
be that it could absorb the liver you ate or something. ALEXIS: Could you take it in large doses once
a week instead of daily doses? DAVE: If you take too much activated charcoal,
it will constipate you. So, I don’t really have that problem from activated charcoal.
I would need an enormous amount of it. And if that’s a problem, extra MCT or magnesium
or vitamin C are all well known for flushing the bowels and contributing to disaster pants.
So, I don’t think it’s gonna be much of any issue when you take it. There are lots of
people every year who go to the emergency room and get a ton of the stuff pumped into
their stomach for either food poisoning or kids who swallowed drain cleaner or whatever.
So, it’s relatively innocuous as a supplement even compared to things like vitamin C that
are also quite innocuous. ALEXIS: Okay, and in The Better Baby Book
you talk about doing a daily charcoal cleanse for a month. Is taking pills as good as drinking
charcoal? DAVE: Taking pills is a lot easier. What I
used to do is I would get charcoal and I would mix it in a jar or in a blender with water,
but stuff when you get the right quality, it’s so fine when you open a bag of it, it
makes like a black cloud in the kitchen and it’s electrostatically attracted to plastic
surfaces. So like, your blender, your refrigerator. Like, there’s always like a black kind of
film in the kitchen. It was worth it for the benefits we got, but one of the reasons that
we went through and made a new process for even encapsulating charcoal this fine, was
because I got tired of having it all over the kitchen. One of the problems that manufacturers
of charcoal have is that when it’s this fine, it gums up machines, it clogs up production
facilities, so we solve that problem but it took quite a lot of doing in order to put
it into a pill and I take these pills instead of drinking charcoal water. I look forward
to never drinking charcoal water again. ALEXIS: Me too. It’s gross. Not my favorite. DAVE: Yep. ALEXIS: How many pills of the Upgraded Charcoal
would be an equivalent dose? DAVE: It depends on what’s going on. Like,
if I ate something and 20 minutes later my head is spinning and I just know when I eat
food that isn’t right for me. I’m a delicate flower. Like, I was on antibiotics for 15
years, I lived in a house with Stachybotrys, I’ve had Lyme Disease, like my body has not
had a very happy start the first half of my life. So I just have a built in sense. Something
is not right and my brain just lost it’s sharp edge I’m used to. I would take a couple tablespoons,
like heaping tablespoons of powder, which here would be like, 10 of the pills that I
have. Maybe even 15 in the current Upgraded Charcoal. The pills are about twice what you’ll
find in the little digestive remedy stuff. Those are about 240 milligrams. I put 500
milligrams in mine because charcoal works when you take a little bit more of it. Just
watch out if you’re constipated. If not, I would go heavier if you’re feeling brain fog
or tired or like you’re feeling great, you had a handful of nuts and a half hour later
you can’t concentrate or you’re getting in a fight with your significant other. Food
can do that. ALEXIS: Yeah. I’m glad to hear that taking
pills is just as good as drinking it. Is activated charcoal, this is a question from Joseph “Is
activated charcoal able to bind with blood based or fat based toxins, or just stuff floating
around the digestive tract?” DAVE: Yes to both. It has a strong negative
charge and most toxins, like pesticides and BPA and things like that, have a positive
charge. So they are attracted to it electrically, and sometimes you’ll feel a difference. Even
within a few minutes of taking it. It kind of feels like a blanket got lifted off your
head. It’s much faster acting than you might expect if it was the toxin that was causing
you to have that blanket like feeling. There’s also—when your body excretes fat based toxins,
it does it through the biliary system. It does it through the bile. And most of the
time you excrete bile when you poop, but about 28% recirculate. We recycle bile and we do
that because it’s a survival mechanism in environments without enough fat, it lets us
live longer. But in environments with fat based toxins, it actually is not an evolutionary
advantage. Activated charcoal will bind to bile in the gut and cause you to excrete more
bile than you otherwise would, and this is one of the well known mechanisms of action
of it as a nutritional supplement. So that’s worth understanding. So I take it in my own
body to target fat based as well as protein based toxins in my body. ALEXIS: So, would you recommend taking activated
charcoal at night when also dosing with a magnesium supplement? DAVE: I do. I take it with magnesium and if
the magnesium is already bound to a citrate or a malate or something, as far as my mind
knows, I don’t believe that there’s gonna be a binding effect and I haven’t confirmed
this though with an expert on that subject. I’m 99% sure that it works. I do it, but it’s
possible you might have a reduction in absorption but I know that at least most of the magnesium
goes through because when I do it, I don’t get leg cramps or anything that would happen
if I was off magnesium. ALEXIS: Cool. I like taking magnesium at night.
I find it useful for sleep. I’d like to do a shoutout to our forums. I love our forum
guys. They’re so articulate and so thoughtful about many of the things that they do. I’d
like to thank Hazaa, HZA for writing an amazing post that turned into a series about his experience
with the Upgraded Trainer, the machine. It’s very interesting, and that conversation on
the forum combined with Jonathan Tumen’s presentation at the conference has convinced me to buy
it! So maybe that’ll be the next biohack I’ll be talking about the next time I talk to you
guys! DAVE: Nice. ALEXIS: Catolotus wrote a guide on variations
for bulletproof coffee, and we have several of those on the website as well, like a proven
path to a high energy morning. And Geekgonestrong has been really good about linking to the
blog and podcasts when information is already available. DAVE: Thanks everyone, I totally appreciate
all the extra online love and attention. Every day now I get emails from people who say “Ya
know, I lost x amount of pounds, like 40 pounds or ya know my family’s been transformed, or
I got my brain back and I don’t feel like I have ADD anymore.” And like, people are
really just addressing their nutritional requirements using the simplest thing of all, which is
knowledge. I’m grateful to hear that things are working for people and when people take
the time to share it with their friends and all, I love hearing that it’s happening so
thank you very much. And if you have a story, something that the bulletproof diet or bulletproof
coffee has done for you, please do take a second to drop us a line, post it on Facebook
and the reason I’m asking you to do that is I’m compiling experiences with the bulletproof
diet for the bulletproof diet book. And also make sure that you go to bulletproofdietbook.com
and sign up to get the
first chapter as soon as it’s done, but if you have a testimonial you wanna share about
what it’s done for you, please help me out and help me help other people by sharing what
it’s done for you. ALEXIS: And if you have a picture of you before
and you during or after, please include that! We love to see pictures of you guys. Before
you go, what is the easiest biohack people can try this week? DAVE: The easiest one to try this week, ya
know, I hate to sound like a broken record, but Bulletproof Coffee is one of those things
that’ll launch you into the stratosphere of focus so you can learn what you wanna feel
like anyway. But if you’re not gonna
do that, the new Food Sense app that’s free if you have an iPhone, is a pretty cool way
to do it. Wake up, get your heart rate, get your heart rate before and after you eat,
and you’ll find out if you’re exposing yourself to kryptonite—things that make you week
when you eat and you don’t even know you’re doing it. That’s a pretty neat biohack that doesn’t cost a nickel. ALEXIS: Cool. Thanks Dave. Great show today
and if you guys liked this and got a lot out of it, please give us a review on iTunes. Links from the Show Products Brain Octane Oil
Upgraded Coffee Upgraded Collagen
Upgraded Chocolate Powder Upgraded Whey
Upgraded Glutathione Force Upgraded Coconut Charcoal
Upgraded Focus Brain Trainer HeartMath Inner Balance Links creativeLive
SomaPulse Bulletproof Toolbox
Podcast #63, Alexis Bright 24 © The Bulletproof Executive 2013

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