Ore Fruitcake | Cooking Final Fantasy XIV Food

Ore Fruitcake | Cooking Final Fantasy XIV Food


Welcome to A Recipe Reborn, featuring your favourite foods from Final Fantasy XIV. Hello, my name is Lemon Drop and I develop recipes by combining real life culinary inspiration with the in-game recipe, description, thumbnail, geography and lore! If you’re into FF14 and food, please subscribe and click the bell for a new episode every Tuesday. Today I’m making Ore Fruitcake. If this doesn’t sound familiar to you, it may be because this item is from the very first Starlight Celebration in 2013. It is a popular dessert in Ul’dah and is described as so hard and dense that it causes at least thirty-seven fruitcake related accidents every season. Since this is a seasonal item, there is no in-game recipe, so I plan to make it authentically Ul’dahn by incorporating ingredients local to Thanalan such as Rye flour, cloves, ginger and even though grapes are from La Noscea, I wanted to use sultana raisins in honour of Sultana Nanamo Ul Namo, the ruler of Ul’dah. Naturally, the first Starlight Celebration established the origins and traditions of the festival, and a journalist named Dural Tharal recorded them in an article for the Mythril Eye newspaper. Ishghardian Knights disguised orphans in their red jackets to sneak them into their barracks so that they could shelter and feed them during the coldest days of winter. Those orphans grew up and relived their experience by giving out gifts to children while donning red attire. These acts of kindness and charity became the traditions now celebrated during the Starlight season. Rather than a cake, this is more of a sweet bread recipe similar to banana bread. It’s common to use baking soda or powder in those recipes, but I sometimes find that the amount required to rise those dense breads gives an unpleasant alkaline flavour. This is why I’ve chosen to use yeast. I let it soak in water while I mixed my dry ingredients before adding the wet ones. The goal is to make a moist but not sticky dough. If it needs to be stirred rather than kneaded, that’s how I know I need more flour, so I’m adding it a little bit at a time until it no longer sticks to my hand. That looks about right.
I’m letting this rest in a warm place until it’s doubled in size. While I wait, I’m covering my raisins with water to bring them to boil and soak in hot water for a few minutes to make them plump and tender. I’m not a big fan of candied ginger, or chewing on ginger generally for that matter so I’m infusing some milk with sliced ginger and I’ll use this later to make the glaze. My dough has risen and I’m pressing it down to squeeze out the large air bubbles. Ul’dah is a mining town and this dessert is called Ore Fruitcake, so I want to evoke the shape of boulders, rocks, minerals and precious metals. To do this, I’m cutting my dough in to small chunks to represent the rocks and the raisins will represent the ores. I’ve got my buttered loaf tin and I’m just scattering the dough and raisins in no particular order, but still trying to keep them close together, I don’t want large holes in my fruitcake. I’m covering it and letting it proof in a warm place until it’s doubled in size. This goes into the oven to bake 20 minutes at a time, for about an hour. If you plan to do this at home, make sure you keep an eye on it, because the dough was tossed in sugar so it goes from brown to burned very quickly. Cover it will foil or a lid if it’s getting too dark too quickly. While the cake is cooling, I’m making the glaze by adding the ginger infused milk to powdered sugar and giving it a good stir. The most difficult part is waiting for the cake to be fully cooled before pouring on the glaze, otherwise it will slide right off. And that’s about it, all that’s left to do is watch as the glaze oozes over the rocky chunks of dough and the raisin gems tucked between them. Even though this is a dense cake, the raisins inside give a tender and juicy variation to the texture so each bite feels slightly different in my mouth. The first flavour that you notice is the sweetness, but as that subsides the ginger follows after it and lengthens the overall time you taste and experience it. Anyway, that’s it for the first in a series of four Starlight Celebration recipes I have planned for this month. For the full recipes and instructions, please check out the link to my website in the description below and in the card at the top of the screen. Thank you for watching and I will see you next week for another recipe and another episode.

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