Homewood Heritage – cooking on a cast iron range

Homewood Heritage – cooking on a cast iron range


Welcome to Homewood! I’m David This is my wife, Penelope and we’d like to show you our stove This is a cast-iron stove all the business parts are cast-iron: the cooking plates, top, the doors, the front, and all the oven panels are cast-iron Cast-iron is very suitable for making stoves out of, it’s the traditional material that they’ve been making stoves out of since the beginning of wood stoves it’s the ability of iron to absorb and retain heat that makes it very valuable but apart from that it lends itself to shapes, and repeating shapes because of the molding process and because it’s absorbent it takes a polish so you can polish your stove up and get it looking like new, even after a hundred years OK, so after initial kindling got going we put on some smaller wood it’s burning really nice and hot in there now and I’m gonna put on a bigger piece of wood now this fire will take a pretty big piece of wood this is kind of about maximum in diameter, – 8 inches – but could be at least another 2 or 3 inches longer would go in there that’s a bit of fast burning pine that we’ve put on just to push the oven temperatures up a bit and once the oven gets up we’ll shut it right down and tick it over one of the very real advantages in stove-top cooking is that you have instant access to variable heat so as you can see from that, boiling or getting things going on this side then you can move them across and simmer, away from the firebox the Heritage is a double-oven wood stove with the top oven 3 cubic feet roasting and baking… bread… and whatever in the top and in the bottom oven is more for casseroling and slower cooking and that runs ’round about 3/4 the temperature of the top oven this fire heats our hot water in the rear of the fire is a water jacket and there’s a thermosyphon created between the water jacket and the hot water cylinder there’s two pipes in the water jacket the hot water goes into the top pipe and comes up into the hot water cylinder goes high up in the cylinder and then the lower pipe, the cooler water goes into the lower pipe and goes back into the water jacket so that circulates around and around this is… 40 gallon / 180 L cylinder and is about minimum for this size fire otherwise it would be boiling over all the time yeah… 220 (L) or up to about 300 would be optimum this is a multi-purpose stove: in addition to cooking and heating the hot water it’s been designed to heat the home and it’s well insulated on the sides and the back and the bottom but it releases a certain amount of heat out through the top and the front and would heat a well-insulated house of around about 150 square metres or 1600 square feet

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