5 FOODS TO TRY IN CANADA + CANADIANS SAYING SORRY | Eileen Aldis

5 FOODS TO TRY IN CANADA + CANADIANS SAYING SORRY | Eileen Aldis


We’re in my hometown of London, Ontario
and we were sitting around this morning thinking how we haven’t really eaten anything today
and fantasizing about all the delicious Canadian foods that we can get while we’re home here in Canada. And at one point I was just like,
“Let’s just make a video about it. I can’t decide. Let’s just eat all the things.” So we decided to go out and show you
five foods to try in Canada. I think we’re going to just get the traditional. Woo! And be boring. Fantastic! Did you want the 17 foot by 5 foot version of that? I can slim it down maybe to this size. I think that one. You can get it down to this one. Yeah, let’s do that. Or I can even get it to that one. You don’t want that one. You don’t even want that one. Let’s go with the little one. Yeah, yeah. Aww amazing! Thank you! Appreciate that! That’s so nice! Thank you! Yeah!! Poutine power! That was so nice! That guy was amazing. Ok, I haven’t actually explained what poutine is
so if you haven’t heard of it, maybe you don’t know what it is. It’s delicious. That menu board is full of like different
variations of it but the traditional, original one is just plain old French fries with lots of gravy
and cheese curds and it’s Canadian. It actually originated in the 1950s in rural Quebec. So the absolute best, like, most authentic poutine
you’ll find in Canada is definitely in Quebec. We’re in Ontario. This is pretty close so I’m going to try it. I haven’t had this in a really long time. Like…like months, which is too long for poutine. Mmm that is so good. It’s so bad for you and it is so, so good. Canadian breakfast. Aww nice and squidgy. I know! The curds are good. My arteries. I like the sign that said, ‘Clogging arteries since 2009.’ Well, it’s true. Something happened in Smoke’s Poutinerie
that was distinctly Canadian and I actually caught it on film so I’ll insert it here
but everyone kept saying sorry and I was taking a picture of the back of the restaurant. I just wanted to see the sign
and everybody in the restaurant like stopped. No one wanted to get in the way of my shot and this guy
who was wearing an ‘I Am Canadian’ t-shirt – too perfect – started to walk through the shot,
noticed me about halfway through and went, ‘Oh! Sorry!’ and like ducked down. Oh! Sorry! No worries! And then someone at the front of the restaurant,
who was already almost out the door, she yells back, ‘Oh, sorry! Did I ruin your shot?’ And everyone’s just saying sorry. And I was like, ‘Oh, sorry, no! Oh, sorry, no, I’m just taking a photo. Don’t worry!’ It’s just like, ‘What’s going on?’ We’re all saying sorry. It just made me so happy. I love it. He wants our poutine. You hungry? You’re a hungry little squirrel. Ahh! Whoa, ok. Get that poutine outta here! It’s trying to steal it. Get the poutine! No poutine for you. Bad squirrel. Bad squirrel. When my brother and I were kids
this was our absolute favourite dessert. Like anytime there was a family party and
there were Nanaimo bars… Party on. Party on. Thank you so much. There you go, guys. Thank you so much. You’re welcome. Bye now. Bye! A box of Nanaimo bars! One of my absolute favourite Canadian foods
is definitely Nanaimo bars and you actually buy them frozen
so we had to wait for them to thaw a little bit, which is actually perfect ‘cause it’s so sunny
and we found this cute spot by a bunch of Canadian geese
which seems very appropriate. And I just can’t wait any longer
so I’m gonna bust open this package and eat them. Nanaimo bars have been around since the 1950s
– you can hear the Canada geese behind me. So cute. They’re excited about the Nanaimo bars. They’re really excited. So these are from 1953 was the first published recipe
ever from Nanaimo, British Columbia which is on the west coast of Canada
on Vancouver Island and thank god they made their way east to Ontario so I could eat them all through my childhood. I can’t wait any longer. Mmm my god. Whoa, it’s way softer than I thought. I feel like I wasted my life not having these for so long. Next Canadian food is butter tarts. It’s a dessert and it originates way back
with the Canadian pioneers… …in the prairies. My ‘hood. And they’re these little individually sized
desserts and normally they’re round and it’s just a flaky pastry
and you can fill it with little bits of raisins or nuts. I personally love raisins. I love the raisins. Or, if you’re a butter tart purist,
then you like it like this which is just plain old eggs, sugar, butter, and syrup. So that’s what we’re going to have next. So let’s dig in. Most people who are normal just eat it like this
but I, as a kid growing up, always used a spoon
because I refused to eat the pastry. I don’t know why. And so, even though I’m not a child anymore,
I still like to eat the middle and sometimes I eat the pastry afterward
but I still like to eat it like this. This is not the normal way people eat butter tarts –
just so you know. Mmm so good. Oh, I got a raisin! Yes! Woohoo! For those of us who didn’t grow up
eating it like Eileen with the spoon, this is how we eat it. Too bad there’s no squirrels here. It’s a good thing there aren’t. More for me. This is another one of my favourite Canadian foods:
ketchup chips. Apparently the Hostess Potato Chip Company
in the 1970s exclusively marketed this in Canada and it was a huge hit and I love them. I grew up eating these so I’m going to have some. All they had was the ‘family size.’ It’s ok. It’s so good. All right Eileen’s favourite are ketchup chips,
mine are dill pickle chips. Kind of tangy. Really weird taste. You wanna try a ketchup chip? Ooh yeah. I feel like you haven’t had them in a long time. No, I haven’t. Are you going to feed it to me? Yeah. I don’t usually…. That is good. It is good, isn’t it? I don’t usually like dill but I’m going to try it again. I’ll give it another shot. This might be the turning point. No. They’re weird. Aww more for me. I don’t really like them. But I will take more ketchup. This ice cream place I’ve been going for so long. Actually my brother played soccer. We used to come here after soccer games all the time so I love this place. And Tiger Tail ice cream is Canadian. I don’t know if it actually started in Canada
or it was created in Canada but it’s almost impossible to find anywhere else and it’s orange ice cream with swirls of black liquorice. It’s delicious and it’s especially popular with kids, I think. Or big kids. That’s good. The saltiness of the liquorice with the sweetness
of the orange ice cream – such a good combo. So? Is it good? That’s good. I forgot about this ice cream. I know, me too!
Well, until today… And I love liquorice. …when I was like, “I need it.” Liquorice and orange is such a great combination. It is. They really complement. I can’t think of any other foods
where you combine liquorice and orange. If you know of any, leave a comment and tell us
‘cause I need to eat more of this. It actually tastes like a Terry’s chocolate orange. But that’s chocolate, not liquorice. No, I know. I guess it’s kind of similar. Similar. Yeah. I am so full after eating all of this delicious food. Me too. But it was really fun. So fun. And we don’t need to eat again any dinner, I’d say. No, that was dinner. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this video
and seeing five Canadian foods. And, if you haven’t already,
please subscribe to our channel for more travel videos and we’ll see you in our next one. Bye!

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