10+ Popular Foods That Are Different in the US

10+ Popular Foods That Are Different in the US


Greetings, fellow food lovers! There’s nothing
better than some pigs in a blanket on game day, chips on the side, and a big apple pie
for dessert, eh? Now, whether you’re American or not, could decide how you just imagined
all those fun foods I mentioned. And wait, there’s more! Check out some other popular
dishes in the US that look different around the world… 1. Pancakes
Let’s say you’re an American tourist in Russia. You wake up, and you’re craving
a big stack of fluffy pancakes smothered in butter and syrup. Oooh, that hits the spot!
You ask for a menu in English, scan it for your morning treasure, and boom – there
it is: pancakes. “I’ll have that, please!” The waiter brings your breakfast out, you
look down, and you’re stunned to see what looks like wimpy paper-thin French crepes
on your plate! “Hey, man, what gives?!” Well, pancakes date back to Ancient Greece
and Rome. Before they were officially dubbed “pancakes” in America, they used to be
called “Indian Cakes.” Crepes, on the other hand, have nothing to do with pancakes
in terms of origin since they date back to 13th-century France. (Kinda gives you the
“crepes”, eh?) 2. Toast
Speaking of breakfast, when it comes to toast, my, do the French have an imagination! American
“toast” is just a toasted piece of bread. Of course, you gotta throw some butter and
jelly on that bad boy! But if you’ve ever had French toast, well, you know it’s a
sweet delight of white bread soaked in a mixture of beaten eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla, and
cinnamon. I guess that’s why they don’t need those big thick pancakes in France! And
I imagine they don’t call it “French” toast over there. (And if you keep goofing
this up, then I imagine YOU’RE toast…) 3. Pigs in a blanket
Alright, it’s football Sunday, and you’ve rolled some mini-hotdogs up in dough and threw
‘em in the oven. If the game you’re watching involves big dudes in helmets & pads throwing
an almond-shaped ball around – and you refer to your game day snack as “pigs in a blanket”
– you must be American. If you’re in the UK, that dish would involve wrapping hotdogs
in bacon (and that “football” you’re watching would be what we call “soccer”
in the US!). Now here’s where it gets trippy: the equivalent of American pigs in a blanket
is called a “sausage roll” in the UK. Yankees call the British variety “bacon-wrapped
hotdogs.” (Boy, that just sucks all the fun right out of it, doesn’t it?) 4. Bacon
Since we’ve touched on the topic of bacon, let’s get that straight too. Bacon in the
US comes from the pig’s belly and is served in thin crispy strips coated with fat. In
the UK, “bacon” is from the pig’s back, and it’s less fatty, thicker, chewy, and
served in round slices. It’s kinda like what Americans refer to as a “Canadian bacon”
or maybe a combination of the US and Canadian types. So, if you’re from the UK and you’re
having a hard time finding some proper “bacon” in the US, maybe ask for the Canadian variety,
eh! 5. Pudding
Now, my fellow Americans will imagine a creamy custard dessert when they think of pudding.
If you were to travel to the UK, you’d get something way different. The British definition
of pudding is anything that’s been boiled in something else. For example, in the UK
and Ireland, they have the infamous “black pudding” that’s served for breakfast – it’s
also called –wait for it — “blood sausage.” (Really? Well that just ends it for me right
there.) They also have sweet puddings, but that would be the cake-like dish we call “flan”
in the US. “Flan” in the UK, however, is what Americans know as “fruit pie.”
(Phew, how confusing. As Shakespeare might have said “A Pie by any other name, would
taste as sweet”… except for that blood sausage thing…) 6. Eggs
Ok, eggs are eggs no matter where you go in the world. I’ll take mine scrambled, please.
But the thing is, stores in Europe don’t keep them refrigerated like they do in the
US. America does it for safety reasons: the Department of Agriculture determined that
the most effective way to fight salmonella is by refrigerating eggs. But that doesn’t
mean European countries don’t take their own safety precautions to fight bacterial
food poisoning. In some parts of Europe, they leave the original coating on the eggs, (there’s
an original coating?) and that coating protects them from contamination. In other parts, they
vaccinate hens to keep the eggs disease-free. 7. Breadsticks
I’m sure you know we have the Italians to thank for this tasty Mediterranean treat.
However, when it comes to the original breadsticks (a.k.a. “grissini”), the food migration
game didn’t go as planned. You see, when we ask for breadsticks in an American restaurant,
we get soft pieces of doughy bread and garlic that we can dip in sauce. But if you were
having lunch in an Italian restaurant and asked for breadsticks, you’d actually get
the original version of “grissini” – crispy baked breadsticks that can accompany your
salad or be crunched on as a snack on its own. 8. Ketchup
Ketchup is another one of those culinary items that got lost in translation. In America,
you know that familiar red paste made from tomato, vinegar, sugar, and all the accompanying
spices. However, if you go to Australia and ask for ketchup on your burger, the waiter
might give you a funny look and say, “You mean tomato sauce?” This goes back 80 years
ago when ketchup hadn’t made its way to Australia yet, and they used to serve tomato
sauce as a condiment instead. Now, even though ketchup has made its way to Australia, it
hasn’t changed in terms of language. (And while we’re here, don’t even get me started
on that whole Ketchup vs. Catsup deal.) 9. Chips
One of the most traditional dishes in the UK is fish and chips. But if you’re an American
and you didn’t know better, you’d be imagining someone eating fish and a handful of Lays
or Doritos. But what they call “chips” are what Americans know as “French fries.”
On the flipside, in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa, what we call chips
(the round things sold in half-empty bags), they call crisps. As for the “French”
part of the American naming, that goes waaay back to the 1800s or even earlier, when potatoes
(not necessarily the sticks we know today) were fried “in the French manner.” “French-fried”
back then was pretty much what we call “deep-fried” today. 10. Cookies
The American understanding of “cookie” comes from the Dutch word “koekje,” which
means “small cake.” And when you think about it, that’s pretty much what cookies
are! Only, maybe they’re a little crunchier. But in most other English-speaking countries
except for Canada, cookies are called “biscuits.” In fact, they only use the term “cookies”
to describe the chocolate chip ones in particular. As for those fluffy little rolls Americans
know as “biscuits,” those are called “scones” elsewhere. Now, here’s my question: what
do they call the sweet cookie-biscuit hybrid we know as “scones” in America? Hmm… 11. Jelly
On a related point, as an American, I smother my biscuits (not cookies or scones!) in butter
and jelly. If you’re in the UK, you’re probably imagining me hopelessly trying to
spread some Jell-O on my bread because for you, “jelly” is my Jell-O and my “jelly”
is your jam! (Ow, my brain!) Of course, we have “jam” in the US, but it usually has
chunks of fruit in it unlike smooth creamy jelly! So, travelers beware! (This kind of
mix-up could end up putting YOU in a Jam- which in this context means a tough spot!
(Oh, my head is spinning…) 12. Pie
Now back to desserts. Mmm, I could go on and on about pie. Pumpkin, apple, blueberry, cherry
– *ahem* anyway, pies in some parts of the world aren’t the sweet fruity round pastries
we know and love in the US. In Greece, for example, pies are savory, and the dough isn’t
as fluffy. They can be made with cheese, spinach, mushrooms, and even some meat! These kinds
are also popular in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Ghana, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe, to
name a few. 13. Milky Way bars
Alright, I know your stomach is growling up a storm by now, so here’s our final example
of a familiar food that might throw you a surprise if you eat it abroad. If you love
American Milky Ways, wait until you try the European version! It’s also made of chocolate
and nougat, of course, but it doesn’t have that layer of caramel in it. I imagine Milky
Way bars in Europe taste pretty similar to the 3 Musketeers bars we have in the US. And
if you’re curious, it got the name Milky Way because it can float in a glass of milk!
(Really. Yeah, go try it! I’ll wait. No.) Alright, Bright Siders, I’d say it’s time
for lunch, what do you think? Before I go fill my belly, I’d like to ask you about
the food in your region – is it cooked or referred to differently in other parts of
the world? Let me know down in the comments! And if you learned something new today, then
give this video a like and share it with your friends!
But – hey! – don’t go anywhere just yet! We have over 2,000 cool videos for you to
check out. All you have to do is pick the left or right video, click on it, and enjoy!
Stay on the Bright Side of life!

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